GODZILLA MOVIE NEWS

Godzilla, Hedorah, Mothra, Rodan... doesn't matter who your favorite Toho monster is, chances are you'll see them in our coming comics. C'mon in and get some good "flame wars" going.

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Postby Void_Master » Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:26 am

So it seems that there's some dissent concerning a vs/solo film from Edwards. That's cool, but if it is a vs film, who should the other Kaiju be? Should it set up like a trilogy and do something like 1.-Rodan/Angurius, 2.-Mothra, 3.-King Ghidorah or should there just be a completely new monster instead?
Go Go Godzilla!

Okay to print.
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Postby Batagor » Mon Mar 28, 2011 12:17 pm

Void_Master wrote:So it seems that there's some dissent concerning a vs/solo film from Edwards. That's cool, but if it is a vs film, who should the other Kaiju be? Should it set up like a trilogy and do something like 1.-Rodan/Angurius, 2.-Mothra, 3.-King Ghidorah or should there just be a completely new monster instead?


I would prefer Toho monsters--not out of any misplaced sense of loyalty or fandom, but because American monsters always seem to end up being some form of giant insect or literal giant animal. For example, although I really enjoyed the Tri-Star Godzilla cartoon, it seemed like every other monster was simply some mutant bug. The Japanese monsters seem to me to be more creative, more titanic, and more... well... like "monsters"! :D

I mean, a giant big isn't a horrible idea (Toho riffed on that theme many times themselves), but in the end, bugs get 'squashed'. Giant monsters though, like Angilas, Rodan, and Ghidorah, must be 'vanquished'! Both Angilas and Ghidorah have been defeated via bloody monsterous beatdown, if memory serves me correctly (Gigantis and GvsGhidorah '91). Such amazing battles just never seem to materialize for mutant insects (with the expection--maybe--for Mothra).
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Postby Varan96 » Tue Mar 29, 2011 4:27 pm

As long as its not Ghidorah I dont care who the other monster is. They use Ghidorah a little to much and after him being the final monster on final wars i want something new
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Postby siphunclekaiju54 » Wed Mar 30, 2011 4:56 pm

Varan96 wrote:As long as its not Ghidorah I dont care who the other monster is. They use Ghidorah a little to much and after him being the final monster on final wars i want something new


I agree, plus Ghidorah showing up in Godzilla's origin movie would be too much too soon. It'd be better if they went with somebody who shares or is connected to Godzilla's origin like Anguirus, or at least somebody they don't have to shoehorn in after introducing Godzilla just so they can have a villain.
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Postby Tymon » Sun Apr 03, 2011 11:40 pm

King Ghidorah would be perfect from a marketing perspective, however. Everyone loves dragons, and if they could create a poster similar to this, everyone and their dog would want to see this movie:

Image

A giant dinosaur fighting a giant three-headed dragon. Visually, it can't be beat. It's one of the reasons why the mediocre 1991 film did so well commercially, I'm willing to bet.
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Postby Mr.Negativity » Fri Jun 24, 2011 9:05 am

From Fresh Voices:
SCREENWRITER PROFILE: DAVE CALLAHAM
Most recently, Dave was hired by Warner Brothers and Legendary Pictures to write the 2014 summer tent-pole Godzilla and he sold an original pitch to Twentieth Century Fox and Producer/ Director McG.


FV: So what’s next for Dave Callaham?

DC:
Before The Expendables was released, I pitched my take on a new Godzilla movie that Warner Brothers and Legendary are working on and was hired to write a first draft. I recently delivered that to the studio.


FV: Going back to the writing process. What’s your philosophy or mentality as a writer?

DC:
I want to elevate. My philosophy as a writer is to always make something better than it ought to be. This is obvious. I’m sure every writer says that. But I really want to, if it’s an action movie I want to make it, like Heat is a good example, again, I want it to be an action movie with characters you actually care about, and stakes and themes. I always want the story to have themes even if it’s the dumbest thing you’ve ever heard. Godzilla is a pretty cut and dry, giant monster smashes stuff. But the reason I got excited about it is because I saw themes and relationships to the modern world that I could tell in this story that was important. I always strive to elevate. And you see a movie like The Dark Knight and it tells you, or Inception, another Chris Nolan movie, it tells you, you can make giant movies that work on many different levels, that are intellectual, that are important, that are valuable and they work on a commercial level. And they’re exciting and they’re fun and they’re popcorn. People don’t do it too much, and I don’t think they try hard enough to do it. But I’d like to try. I do try. And you know, you learn that sometimes you try and things get changed. But if you don’t try then no one will.


FV: So if you’ve got act 1 and act 2 pretty well laid out, how long does it take you to write that first draft? How long do you want to spend?

DC:
Horsemen and Godzilla, the first and last things I’ve done, are pretty similar. I think they both took 3 months for a first draft. And they were both 2 ½ months to write the first 2 acts, and I wrote the last act in a week on both of them. Because it’s a runaway train at that point, and there’s no more questions. Act 2 is the hardest, because I know where I need to get them, how am I gonna get them there? By act 3, if you can’t just roll with act 3 you’ve messed up somewhere. Act 3 should write itself.

I get really emotional writing act 3. It’s coming out of me at that point. A lot of times I have to struggle to force myself to write the first two acts. First act’s easy, second act is hard. Third act, I’m just dying to do it. I’ve spent all this time leading you to a place, now it’s time to show you.

FV: Ho much time do you spend rewriting?

DC:
Depends. Like on Godzilla I was under a pretty strict time crunch. So I wrote it, it was very, very long. I sent it to a couple friends and I did a week of super intensive rewriting. If you’re writing on spec you’ve got the luxury of time so it just depends on how long it takes to get it right. Usually once or twice. I don’t like to rewrite.


FV: How do you approach the blank page? Where do you go to find inspiration?

DC:
I watch recent movies that I like. I read a lot of comic books because to me it has the right combination of text and story-telling and visuals. If I’m writing a small character piece I could read fiction and be fine. But on Godzilla I wanted to always be thinking in giant, sweeping science fiction terms. So I was watching a lot of those types of movies. You know, I could be watching Star Trek and it would help me with Godzilla just because it put me in the right mindset of “the universe is yours to play with.” I watch a lot of Discovery channel stuff, History Channel and that always helps.

On Godzilla as an example and Doom I did this too. I watched a lot of nature documentaries because I felt like I’m writing about an animal; it’s just a giant animal. But if I can get some cool set pieces out of behavior that I see animals doing in the wild in the show, then I can maybe translate that into something. Just whatever’s appropriate. And then I read a lot. I’ll be reading fiction for the sake of constant creativity, but I also I feel like on everything I write there’s research I could be doing.

On the script that became The Expendables I read all about mercenaries. I read biographies of mercenaries and I read about first hand accounts of armed conflicts and things like that. On Godzilla I read about the history of Godzilla, Godzilla’s history through film. But I also read a 600 page manual that is handed out to municipal areas, cities, counties, states, about disaster preparedness and how to react when a disaster does hit and how to make sure that you rebound from it. Because I was trying to tell the story from a perspective of Godzilla being treated as a disaster. So anything that I find appropriate I’ll read. Even if I don’t get a specific idea out of it creativity-wise, it gets me in the right mindset. I don’t want to be doing anything while I’m writing a script other than living in the world of the script. So if I’m not writing it and I turn around, I’m trying to spend time with my wife and have fun, but if I’m reading, I’m reading something that’s gonna help me in the right mindset, and if I’m watching something hopefully it’s gonna help me do that too.
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Postby Batagor » Fri Jun 24, 2011 10:09 am

Thanks for the post, Mr. Negativity! Good information here.

While I tend to be an optimist, this interview did not inspire confidence...

FV: Going back to the writing process. What’s your philosophy or mentality as a writer?

DC:
I want to elevate. My philosophy as a writer is to always make something better than it ought to be.


:?

FV: Ho much time do you spend rewriting?

DC:
Depends. Like on Godzilla I was under a pretty strict time crunch. So I wrote it, it was very, very long. I sent it to a couple friends and I did a week of super intensive rewriting. If you’re writing on spec you’ve got the luxury of time so it just depends on how long it takes to get it right. Usually once or twice. I don’t like to rewrite.


"Time crunch" and "I don't like to rewrite" do not instill confidence...

FV: How do you approach the blank page? Where do you go to find inspiration?

DC:
...On Godzilla as an example and Doom I did this too. I watched a lot of nature documentaries because I felt like I’m writing about an animal; it’s just a giant animal.


THIS is the nail in the coffin. "Just a giant animal". Godzilla is anything but "a giant animal"--I'm not saying this with fanboy snobbery, but rather an objective eye on the character. Godzilla has NEVER been protrayed as "just a giant animal"--excpet in the 1998 film. He is a living, breathing disaster, a force of nature, heck even defender of good, but never some giant animal that escaped from the zoo... ugh.

Thankfully we've got IDW comics until Toho starts producing Godzilla movies again.... sorry to be the pessimist. :(
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Postby MechGamera » Fri Jun 24, 2011 2:15 pm

From this interview I don't think this guy understands Godzilla or the concept one Iota. Not impressed or holding out much faith.
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Postby ebirahsmeg1 » Sat Jun 25, 2011 8:29 am

MechGamera wrote:From this interview I don't think this guy understands Godzilla or the concept one Iota. Not impressed or holding out much faith.



Agreed. When I found out the person behind "DOOM" was writing the script, I felt disgusted. And this interview fails to prove me wrong about this overrated hack....he seems totally clueless about Godzilla.

Thankfully, there is at least this good tidbit of news:

Gareth Edwards, who directed Monsters, was attached in January 2011 to direct the new Godzilla film. The first draft screenplay by David Callaham will be rewritten by a yet-to-be-announced writer. Edwards said of his plans, "This will definitely have a very different feel than the most recent US film, and our biggest concern is making sure we get it right for the fans because we know their concerns. It must be brilliant in every category because I’m a fan as well."


Thank God it's being rewrittened....
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Postby MechGamera » Sat Jun 25, 2011 11:36 am

Here's hoping he's not just blown smoke up the fan's ***. I here it is now dated for 2014.
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Postby Warzonebeta » Sat Jun 25, 2011 6:26 pm

Ok...

I say bring in any of these tree;
Destoroyah - Humans make weapon, weapon makes Satan-Crab.
Biollante - Godzilla DNA effects a woman and combines her DNA with a rose.
Obsidius - Nature vs. Nature
There are no fools in life only idiots.

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Postby ebirahsmeg1 » Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:47 am

I think in all Godzilla-related forum discussions regarding the LP Godzilla film, we need to stopped using "2012"...there is no way this film is coming out in 2012....we'll be lucky to even get a trailer in 2012, if that.
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Postby Mr.Negativity » Wed Jul 06, 2011 8:53 pm

From Heat Vision:
Comic-Con 2011: Guillermo del Toro and 'Pacific Rim' Cast Set Panel
Borys Kit wrote: Legendary Pictures doesn’t have a lick of footage to show but it’s got the talent to throw its first-ever Comic-Con panel.

Pacific Rim, Guillermo del Toro’s latest creature feature doesn’t open until July 12, 2013, but the filmmaker will be there along with stars Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Charlie Day and Rinko Kikuchi as well as screenwriter Travis Beacham.

Jeff Bridges, Ben Barnes and Alicia Vikander will be on hand to talk about Seventh Son, the company’s adaptation of the young adult fantasy based on the Matt Greenberg book with the project’s director, Sergei Bodrov.

Director Alex Proyas (Knowing) and Bradley Cooper will chat about Paradise Lost while the creator of video game Mass Effect, Casey Hudson, and the man writing its screen adaptation, Mark Protosevich, will kibitz about that sci-fi project.

Legendary’s chairman and CEO, Thomas Tull, as well as CEO Jon Jashni, will also be in attendance to answer fan questions.
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Postby Mr.Negativity » Wed Jul 06, 2011 9:08 pm

Here’s the full press release:
LEGENDARY ENTERTAINMENT ANNOUNCES FIRST-EVER FILM PANEL

AT 2011 COMIC-CON® INTERNATIONAL IN SAN DIEGO


Burbank, CA – July 6, 2011 – For the first time ever, Legendary Entertainment will hold a standalone panel to provide the Comic-Con® International audience with an early look at some of the films from Legendary’s upcoming slate. On Friday, July 22nd, audience participants will have the opportunity to attend an engaging panel consisting of cast and filmmakers from upcoming Legendary films including PACIFIC RIM, SEVENTH SON and PARADISE LOST, all to be distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, as well as MASS EFFECT.

Fans can expect to witness on-stage camaraderie between and Q&A’s with:

PACIFIC RIM

Acclaimed writer, producer and director, Guillermo del Toro alongside cast members including Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Charlie Day, and Rinko Kikuchi as well as screenwriter, Travis Beacham.

SEVENTH SON


Academy Award® winner, Jeff Bridges and THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA star, Ben Barnes, alongside Alicia Vikander and director, Sergei Bodrov.

PARADISE LOST

Bradley Cooper and KNOWING director, Alex Proyas.

MASS EFFECT

Game creator, Casey Hudson and screenwriter adapting the game to film, Mark Protosevich.

Legendary’s Chairman and CEO, Thomas Tull as well as Chief Creative Officer, Jon Jashni, will also be in attendance to answer fan questions and to speak directly with cast and filmmakers about this exciting slate of upcoming films. Geoff Boucher of the Los Angeles Times, who is also the founder of HeroComplex.com, will moderate the panel.

About Legendary Entertainment

Legendary Entertainment is a leading media company with film, television and comics divisions dedicated to owning, producing and delivering content to mainstream audiences with a targeted focus on the powerful fandom demographic. Through complete or joint ownership, Legendary is building a library of marquee media properties and has established itself as a trusted brand which consistently delivers high-quality, commercial entertainment including some of the world’s most popular intellectual property. Among the wholly-owned film projects that Legendary Entertainment is currently developing in-house are Pacific Rim, directed by Guillermo del Toro; an adaptation of the phenomenally successful interactive game universe Warcraft; Godzilla, based on Toho Company’s famed character; Warren Ellis’ Gravel; and Mass Effect, based on Electronic Arts and BioWare’s hit videogame franchise. Legendary has co-produced more than 25 Warner Bros. films, including the recent smash hit, The Hangover Part II, which holds the distinction of posting the highest opening weekend gross ever for a comedy film, the critically acclaimed Inception, which has been a box office smash grossing more than $825 million worldwide, as well as the global blockbusters Clash of the Titans ($493 million worldwide), The Dark Knight ($1 billion worldwide), 300 ($456 million worldwide) and The Hangover ($467 million worldwide).
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Postby Mr.Negativity » Fri Jul 15, 2011 3:51 pm

From Motion Captured:
Legendary brings in David Goyer to rewrite 'Godzilla' - Does this mean they're getting closer to a greenlight for the King Of Monsters?
Drew "Moriarty" McWeeny wrote:I've had several conversations over the last few years with Thomas Tull about Godzilla, both generally and specifically.

If you don't know Tull's name, he's the Big Cheese at Legendary Pictures, the company that has served as one of the primary financing partners for Warner Bros. the last few years, and he is a fascinating figure, a guy who came to Hollywood from the world of high finance but who is genuinely a giant movie nerd. Sure, he's a financial partner in the Pittsburgh Steelers, and a guy who build a giant hedge fund, but movies are one of his great passions.

And even with movies as a general passion for Tull, the character of Godzilla is a particular passion, something he loves dearly. Right now, as Legendary prepares for their first Comic-Con panel next week, I'm excited to see what sort of presentation they've put together for "Pacific Rim," which is a big giant demented monster and mecha movie that Guillermo Del Toro and Travis Beacham have cooked up. It's a wild read, and I can't even imagine what sort of outrageous energy Del Toro's eventual film will have. I know there was some confusion during development when it was reported that "Pacific Rim" would be replacing "Godzilla," but despite the presence of giant monsters in both projects, I don't think that would be as easy as previously suggested.

"Godzila," after all, comes with its own mythology, its own history, and over 50 years of pop culture baggage. If you're going to make a movie about Godzilla, you need to consider all of that when crafting your approach. Toho, the company that created the character and released his movies, is onboard to distribute this new version in Japanese theaters when it's ready, and according to Tull, they're very protective now of a new Godzilla after their experience with Sony in 1998. Everyone involved seems well aware of just how easy it would be to get this wrong, and they seem dedicated to getting it right.

Gareth Edwards, whose microbudget movie "Monsters" garnered him some serious attention, is onboard to direct this new version, and until now, Dave Callaham has been the writer on the film. It looks like that changed, though, and now David Goyer is coming onboard to rewrite the film. What I can tell you about the approach the studio is taking to the film is that Godzilla is not "just" a giant monster. He is a character, a major force of nature, and there will definitely be other giant monsters in the world. They're focusing on the notion of Godzilla as a defender of Earth, the one thing that can stop some of these other giant creatures, and while there will obviously be a human story playing out with the giant monster story, don't expect it to overwhelm or overshadow the monsters. They know why you're going to the theater, and they are determined to give you a real, no-compromises Godzilla film featuring the giant lizard you know and love already. There are definite design choices they'll make, and the official Toho Godzilla has gone through many changes over the years, but I guarantee when you see this one for the first time, you will know immediately that it is Godzilla.

Goyer is one of those guys who knows the studio system and game very well, and I have no doubt this was an open assignment people were fighting for. What he does well is think big-picture, and this is an important franchise for Warner and for Legendary. If all goes well, they could make a number of these. If they screw it up, they'll be a footnote in the character's history, just like the Emmerich version. I know they're doing everything they can to avoid that, and I'm curious to see now if they set a 2013 date for this one, and if so, how fast things will start to come together.

One thing's for sure… we'll be covering any developments on "Godzilla" eagerly, and we look forward to seeing his return to theaters as soon as possible.
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