Popeye comic from IDW?

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Popeye comic from IDW?

Postby ebirahsmeg1 » Sun Sep 11, 2011 7:02 am

Now that we are approaching the New Year, any updates on an actual release date?
Last edited by ebirahsmeg1 on Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:35 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby emb021 » Sun Sep 11, 2011 1:46 pm

I don't recall a Popeye comic, but there is the collection of Popeye comics that Yoe Books did.
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Postby ebirahsmeg1 » Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:47 am

Now that the New Year is approaching, are there any updates on an exact release date?

Anyone else interested in this comic? Or am I the only one? :lol:

Just in case anyone missed it, here are links to the news surrounding this upcoming IDW title:

http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page ... e&id=33457

Here was the news posted by IDW themselves back in July:
http://www.idwpublishing.com/news/article/1888/


Popeye Returns to Comics with IDW

Thursday, Jul 21st, 2011



All-new adventures with the “Sailor Man” start in 2012

San Diego, CA (July 21, 2011)—At San Diego Comic-Con today, IDW Publishing announced another impressive expansion of the company’s partnership with King Features to bring POPEYE back to comic books. IDW’s POPEYE comics will offer all-new adventures with this famous character and his friends, including Olive Oyl, Bluto, Wimpy and Swee’Pea. The monthly POPEYE series will be edited by IDW’s co-founder and chief executive officer, Ted Adams.

Created by Elzie Crisler Segar in January 1929, Popeye the Sailor Man quickly became one of the most popular and enduring comics characters of all time. In addition to headlining his own comic strip for over eighty years, Popeye has also been featured in television cartoons, video games, live action movies and countless merchandise.

“I grew up reading Segar’s Popeye and we’ll be bringing his sensibility to our new series,” said Adams. “We’ll be announcing our all-star creative team as SDCC, and plan to launch in early 2012.”
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Postby Gryphon » Wed Jan 04, 2012 9:45 pm

Im hoping to hear more soon.
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Postby Bovy » Thu Jan 19, 2012 12:50 am

All-New Popeye Comics Debut in April

Acclaimed creator Roger Langridge to write series

San Diego, CA (January 18, 2012)—IDW Publishing today announced that comic industry star Roger Langridge will write the company’s all-new POPEYE comic series, which will debut in April 2012. Expanding their partnership with King Features to include new material, IDW’s POPEYE comics will offer all-new adventures with the famous “Sailor Man” and his friends, including Olive Oyl, Bluto, Wimpy and Swee’ Pea. Joining Langridge to bring Popeye back to comics is rising-star artist Bruce Ozella. The monthly POPEYE series will be co-edited by IDW’s co-founder and chief executive officer, Ted Adams and renowned comics expert Craig Yoe.

“I grew up reading Segar’s Popeye and we’ll be bringing his sensibility to our new series,” said Adams. “Especially now with our all-star creative team, I’m really looking forward to launching this series in April.”

Throughout his more than twenty years in the comics industry, Langridge has garnered critical and fan acclaim for his work on an impressive list of projects, including the Harvey Award-winning Muppet Show Comic Book (Boom! Studios) and Thor: The Mighty Avenger (Marvel Comics).

“Ever since I was a kid, the two cartoonists who have had the biggest influence on me have been Carl Barks and E.C. Segar, so getting a chance to write Popeye is quite a thrill,” said Langridge. “I’m especially pleased that IDW have decided to go with a Segar-flavored interpretation. As much as I like some of the later versions of the character, for me, it’s those early strips where the magic really happened. Just as well Segar drew everybody with big feet, because Bruce and I have some enormous shoes to fill!”

Created by Elzie Crisler Segar in January 1929, Popeye the Sailor Man quickly became one of the most popular and enduring comics characters of all time. In addition to headlining his own comic strip for over eighty years, Popeye has also been featured in television cartoons, video games, live action movies and countless merchandise.

POPEYE #1 debuts in April, featuring a cover from Bruce Ozella, and a rare incentive cover from Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Jules Feiffer.

http://www.idwpublishing.com/news/article/2191/
Preview art on the IDW-page.
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Looks AWESOME! (Just fix the typo!)

Postby KGForce » Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:33 pm

The art by Bruce Ozella is truly amazing. It looks like it was done by E.C. Segar. Love it.

But please fix this typo before it is published:

From this preview at CBR, I see in the 6th panel, the word DOESN'T is misspelled as DOSEN'T
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Postby Gryphon » Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:08 am

So its apparently a 4 issue mini?
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Postby destro! » Sat Mar 10, 2012 3:07 pm

I am really looking forward to this series. The article says it hits in April but I noticed the title was missing from the May solicitations. I wonder what is up...
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Postby ebirahsmeg1 » Sat Apr 14, 2012 10:47 pm

So, is this out yet? If so, has anyone read it or care to share their thoughts?
GIANTC0ND0R!!!!!!!! :eek:

"Someone kick me, kick me hard! We're stupid." - Corn on the cob eatin' Hippie (Godzilla vs Gigan)
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Postby Mr.Negativity » Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:17 pm

He's Popeye the sailor man, and he's back with a new series
Brian Truitt wrote:With his one eye, bulbous nose, sour grimace and ever-present pipe, Popeye would never be confused with Brad Pitt in the looks department.

That ugly mug, though, is part of the enduring appeal of the ageless sailor man for Eisner-nominated comics writer Roger Langridge, and doing a new Popeye original comic — the first in more than 30 years — was definitely an "ofker" he couldn't "refyousk."

"Popeye, whatever else you might say about him, never had the handicap of cuteness holding him back," Langridge says of the unlikely cartoon and comics star of the 1930s.

Debuting Wednesday, IDW's Popeye book finds Langridge and a host of artists such as up-and-comer Bruce Ozella (who illustrates the first issue) and Tom Nelly are crafting the latest adventures of spinach-loving Popeye, his girl Olive Oyl, baby Swee'Pea, bully Bluto and hamburger-loving scamp Wimpy.

Under the guidance of IDW co-founder Ted Adams and comics historian Craig Yoe, Popeye will draw influence mainly from the original strips created in 1929 by Elzie Crisler Segar. The self-contained stories in each issue will be longer than those first Popeye strips that were part of Thimble Theatre, Langridge says, and in his first issue, Popeye and crew venture to Jeep Island to find a potential mate for Eugene the Jeep.

Lanridge has been " wallowing in the history" of Popeye over the years, he says, and it's one of the reasons why he was chosen to be the man to script Popeye in the 21st century. "Craig has been great in basically trusting me to know most of this stuff already."

A British writer, Langridge has been doing his homework on the sailor with the oversized forearms since he was little, growing up on the Fleischer Studios theatrical cartoons that originally ran from 1933 to 1957.

He didn't become an ardent fan until he was 10, when he read a Popeye chapter in the book All in Color for a Dime in the late 1970s. Langridge had become a bit obsessed with the character by 1980, when Robert Altman's Popeye was released with Robin Williams in the title role. Although the film was considered a flop, it put the sailor back into pop culture, and Langridge devoured all the collected strips with all the gusto of a booming tank tattoo on a bicep.

While Langridge knows the character well, he concedes he's still grappling with Popeye's distinct speech patterns and vocabulary, where words like "horsh," "suspishkous" and "ettitkkik" (that's Popeye-speak for "etiquette," by the way) are common.

"There are so many idiosyncrasies to navigate," Langridge says. "Yet, on the other hand, you can't make it too eccentric or it won't read smoothly. So it's a bit of a tightrope, and one I will probably fall off of fairly regularly."

He's not consciously writing anything in a contemporary way, but Popeye's sweetie actually seems to be a pretty modern woman in Langridge's series. The foundations Segar had in the strip were actually forward-looking to begin with, he says, and Segar's Olive Oyl was "a much more capable, strong-willed and — dare I say — violent individual than the soppy perpetual victim of the Fleischer cartoons."

Segar's work has a timeless quality, Langridge adds, "set in an environment that never really seems to be tied down to any particular era. So I've had to monkey with things very little in order to make it seem as if the stories are happening in some kind of 'now.' "

One of Langridge's favorites so far, though, happens to be J. Wellington Wimpy, the man who "will gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today" and is one of comics' all-time great creations, says the cartoonist, who is writing and drawing Boom! Studios' Snarked! and penning a story for Archaia's next Jim Henson's Storyteller anthology.

"Writing Wimpy is an absolute joy. He's such a complex, layered individual. While you never doubt that his heart is basically in the right place — to a given value of 'right' — he consistently lets everyone down for his own selfish ends. He can talk his way out of literally anything, and make the person he's tricking out of his next meal feel like a heel for not doing it sooner. And his use of language is glorious!"

Langridge plans on including many of Segar's characters — the second issue features the return of Willy Wormwood, the first Thimble Theatre villain back in 1919, and will be the first meeting between him and Popeye. (Willy was written out of the strip before 1929.) Also, fans will be seeing Poopdeck Pappy, Alice the Goon, King Blozo, Oscar, Rough-House and other usual suspects.

The writer has been asked not to add new folks to that sizable supporting cast, he says, but there will be one-offs "who can wander off into the sunset at the end, and if nobody ever sees them again it'll be no big deal — though, of course, if anybody else uses them in the future, I'll be enormously flattered. Not holding my breath, mind you."

Cans of spinach made Popeye "strong to the finish" — as the old theme song goes — and they'll also be making appearances in the new series, although not as much as some might expect.

Langridge is sticking to the Segar stories as much possible, where Popeye would often chow down, but the original creator never used spinach in the way as the old Fleischer cartoons. In those, it was almost a deus ex machina, where a well-timed snack often gave Popeye the powerful "muskles" he needed to save the day.

Still, Langridge says Popeye will be eating a ton of the stuff. "It's such a huge part of the Popeye myth. We just won't be showing it as a magical thing that gives him super powers for 10 minutes."

These days, guys usually have to hit the gym to get the same effect Popeye had with a trip to the canned-vegetable aisle. But he still has a lot of traits that Langridge thinks make him very relatable as an everyman, from his complete lack of pretention to his willingness to take a stand.

"These are universal qualities that don't ever really go out of fashion," the writer says. "At the same time, there's his sheer bizarreness — how many other pop-culture icons can be said to be ugly, one-eyed, tattooed, with multiple speech impediments and a vegetable fetish?"
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Postby Mr.Negativity » Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:19 pm

From CA:
Don't Ask! Just Buy It! - April 25, 2012: IDW's POPEYE
* POPEYE #1
I can't think of a more appropriate writer than Roger Langridge to take on the newest (miniseries) comic book incarnation of E.C. Segar's sailor man, and Bruce Ozella's artwork for this issue is very much in the Segarian mode. (The regular cover's a cute homage to Action Comics #1; the variant is a Jules Feiffer sketch, which is a good idea too.) Langridge, in his formidable writer/artist capacity, also has Snarked! #7 out this week, continuing his wildly charming (and not entirely un-Segar-like) take on Lewis Carroll's creations.
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Postby ER » Fri Apr 27, 2012 5:09 pm

Bought Popeye #1 and love it! More please! :)
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Postby Gryphon » Fri May 11, 2012 2:17 pm

According to bleeding cool, this is now going to be published by Boom Studios
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Postby Gryphon » Fri May 11, 2012 2:50 pm

Bleeding cool has corrected the article and its an ongoing from IDW.
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Postby fumetti » Wed May 30, 2012 2:16 pm

My 2 yr old son picked #1 out from the shelf. Eye-catching cover!

"Dosen't" was corrected.
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